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    Team 6 :: Teachers as Talent Scouts

    Link to NTLB 2010 Homepage

    Wiki Reflection Activity:

    Find a way to represent your team's design process and turn it in with your reflection sheet. If it makes sense, include process phases.



    Generate 3 or more anecdotes about your team's process that you would love to share will help teach your grandchildren design thinking when take a d.school classes. Example: In order to test how people act when they are anxious, we had people drink a 2 litters of water and wouldn't let them use the restroom until they answered 2 trivia questions (true student example about prototyping an experience with limited resources).


    In order to figure out whether a well-designed room/collaborative space could increase teacher collaboration, we created a model room out of white boards and post-its and random props in 10 minutes flat, and then gave a teacher a virtual tour through Skype and a video cam.

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    Without asking a single interview question, we learned more about a teacher's views on AP than any other interview we had conducted by showing her a storyboard of a video we planned to make and asking for her stream of consciousness reactions.

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    By talking to someone who hated AP, whom the principal was surprised we wanted to talk to, who even himself questioned whether we were sure we wanted to talk to him, we got some of the nuggets of insight that led us to our final solution.

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    Rapidly prototyping a storyboard of a video in 30 minutes and testing that was able to yield a surprising amount of user feedback which saved us a ton of production time on developing video footage to test.
    ----

    Individually, please add 3 elements to each category of the I like, I wish, how to wiki page.



    VIDEO SCRIPT PROTOTYPE 1.0


    As a teacher, I had a surprising experience.

    I saw a student transform in front of my eyes. He was in my standard-level economics class, and he was bored. He’d come in sleepy, wanting to put his head on the desk, bored, and disengaged. I thought, “This student is totally unmotivated,” and wondered if he’d ever make it in school.

    Then, he turned up in my advanced psychology class later that day. He was animated, fully of energy, engaged, and thoughtful. I thought, “who is this kid, and what’s happened to him? With this attitude and work ethic, he could pass the AP test if he keeps this up.”

    I wondered what the explanation was, so recently I went back and asked him.

    [insert brett talking about the difference in the level of material, which class he matched better with, etc.]

    And I had this idea that maybe a lot of the students whose race or income group is on the lower end of the achievement gap – Latino students, African-American students, low-income students – might be activated by higher-level content in the same way that Brett had been. Could their low motivation and disengagement be turned around if we upgraded them to AP? Or would they continue to be low performers?

    We found some reasons for hope when we talked to other teachers. More than any other factor, teachers said that student motivation had the biggest impact on success in AP. if we could activate that motivation with higher-level classroom material in an AP class, then we could really turn things around for disengaged students who needed more of a challenge.

    So could we find anyone who could handle AP but wasn’t being activated to take on that challenge?

    Hundreds of teachers we talked to told us that there are lots of factors besides ability to succeed that keep some very talented students – especially low-income and minority students – out of AP.

    Teachers told us: Lower confidence, lower expectations, they don’t have friends in AP, they don’t know much about it…

    So I went out and we added 35 low-income and minority students to our advanced classes in one year. Carl was one among them. He was in the lowest-level classes, earning low grades, and may very well have stayed there if we didn’t take a chance on upgrading him to advanced classes. Carl spent the next two years taking all advanced classes before he graduated.

    Time magazine says 1/5 of high school dropouts are gifted and talented. Who are these students? how can we find them? If we bump them up, how do we know if they can succeed?

    The 35 students we bumped up did well in AP, so we tried it with 350 students districtwide. Those students did well, too.

    It wasn’t all roses and good numbers, though.

    [story of a student who struggled and persevered, and how the teacher helped them through – particularly the Jim Cullison story].

    And many of us were worried along the way about whether we could provide what these new, previously unmotivated students needed to succeed at the highest levels. What would happen to our pass rates? Could I achieve in my classroom what had happened in our school and then our district, or would I have trouble reaching these new AP students?

    [talk about tools to support teachers and students, some of the nuts and bolts of the program model]

    end with missing student talking about what the change meant for them, how they were changed, and the teacher saying how proud they were to be a part of it.


    Teacher feedback on the prototype:

    *Want more color around the tools and how teachers can use them/do this work

    *Love the beginning

    *I've heard a worry that the students will fail and then lose confidence in themselves. How do you address this?

    *Great use of students to help make the case -- use those students who've changed minds already in order to reach the reluctant educator.


    VIDEO SNIPPET PROTOTYPES!

    Luis- Why I Like AP: http://vimeo.com/11705370
    Luis-Reg Econ vs AP Econ: http://vimeo.com/11706145
    Marquise- Not In AP: http://vimeo.com/11705074
    Quinntesha-Government Class is Boring: http://vimeo.com/11705473
    Quinntesha- Can't Get In: http://vimeo.com/11705547
    Victoria- How I Got In: http://vimeo.com/11705632
    Victoria- My Experience: http://vimeo.com/11705787
    Maya- Everyone takes AP: http://vimeo.com/11706029
    Maya- AP Teachers and Students: http://vimeo.com/11705866

    Download file "files for groups_Page_3_ZACH.jpg" (team agreement)


    Prototype 1: Puzzle Piece Man


    Welcome!
    College grad
    Higher Grades
    Engaged
    Higher test scores

    Bored
    Lower grades
    Go away!
    Lower test scores
    Drop out of high school









    Prototype 2: Missing Students Playing Cards



























    For April 27th class:
    The 2-3 Analogous Situations we explored and what we learned:
    1) Navy diversity recruiting
    Learned:
    Wow -- so this is a real command-style intervention to solve the diversity problem. The head of the Navy put together a video instructing the officer selection panels to choose candidates in the interest of diversity, based on his idea that a navy should be as diverse -- look like -- the country it serves. Not only did he instruct them to increase diversity as they select who is moving up the ranks in the Navy, he also built several other hard incentive structures into their process. Our interviewee said that "managing diversity" was a component of how every officer was evaluated. What were their rates of promotion of diverse candidates? Rates of recruiting diversity to their unit, retention of diversity, complaints about diversity, etc. He told us that officers who did not manage diversity (i.e., do well on these criteria) did not move up.

    They also broke down the "diversity pipeline" into the issue of inflow versus holes in the pipe. And they decided to increase inflow so that if there were holes, some of the diversity could lead out and you'd still end up with an officer corps that reflected national diversity. And they also worked to cover up holes by surfacing diversity problems, and this work around evaluating people on their management of diversity.

    2) Quest selection model
    Learned:
    Quest's model for selecting talented low-income students for top-end colleges is very deep. The application has often run twenty pages, and is very writing and character intensive. This is an interesting approach that sparks a lot of thoughts of contrast with how teachers would need to operate in order to find hundreds of missing students in their high school for AP or IB. In particular, Quest wants to collect a lot of information from very talented students so that it can pick a very small slice of the population for matching with schools like Yale and Stanford. They do this because they need to deliver highly selective candidates that will inspire their partner universities to continue coming back to use their matching/sourcing service. Part of our goal is probably to be less selective and to be very lean (low time cost), and very independent of students having strong existing motivation and ambition. In other words, the Quest process picks out and we want to pick up lots of students. We think that doing so will activate their abilities and create the inspiration/motivation/skills needed for the stage at which Quest engages them for college-going.

    3) Indian Caste System
    Learned:
    It was fascinating -- the takeaway in learning more about the Indian caste system was that the system of reforms after the long-standing history of segregation and discrimination were similar in India to what's happened in the U.S. It's interesting to go (in mind space) around the globe and consider an analagous situation and to find that there are not major differences in approaches. This suggests that maybe there might not be a new breakthrough idea writ large out there, but rather that solutions will come from pulling together some of the strategies that have already been in play but not fully realized. In particular, post-caste-system reforms in India apparently involved policy/legislative changes coupled with practices of affirmative action to try to redress the remnants of past injustice. And, in India, as in the U.S., discrimination lingers in a million small places that the policies can't reach, despite the Herculean efforts to squeeze those discriminatory practices out of existence.

    Feedback on our rough prototype:

    Comments from a principal:

    AP teachers are currently focused on their pass rate and I think this contributes to the skepticism about closing the gap. I think a recognition "badge" is a great idea and it would be great if it was somehow tied to some kind of professional growth incentive - like becoming National Board Certified or a stipend or ............
    not sure what the training part means
    $ or other rewards always a good idea
    Seems to me sometimes that this process would be facilitated by student leadership discussions around stereotyping and pressure on students (each other)

    Let's not forget a parent ed component.


    What we learned about the user from our rough prototype:

    It seems like this principal wants more involvement from many more parties -- particularly parents and students, as well as administrative commitment from her boss. It is interesting to think about the tradeoff between holistic strategies and the impracticality that sometimes comes along with them. An important design challenge!

    Our most current POV statement (descrip of user) needs ______ (think verb) b/c ______ (insight). :
    Tenth grade teachers need motivation, tools, and time to identify more diverse students to encourage to participate in AP/IB because they are too busy to take on extra responsibility and don't necessarily believe more diversity will work or don't see it as their role to take that on.


    ideas/components/aspects we are going to prototype on Thursday, April 29th:

    A – an evaluation that measured (1) growth in participation in the program, (2) growth in diversity (i.e., closure of gaps), (3) growth in success (passing increasing — in #s, not %s). If all three categories were achieved, there’d be something around a scouting merit badge (though obviously nothing so cheesy, but the point being that those three things add up to a successful AP teacher evaluation. The other part of the teacher principal conversation would be around teacher needs/supports/ideas for improving and working toward the objectives outlined in the evaluation.

    B— scout training (preceding the evaluation), which would entail
    *potentially being optional/chosen to increase buy-in (but if chosen we would try to find ways to heavily incentivize that choice)
    *hearing from master “scouts” at the school or at other schools
    *introducing and making available a scouting toolbox (or knapsack)
    *introducing incentives
    *introducing/developing individualized action plans for scouts
    *targets
    *q&a

    C — Time for scouting, created through:
    *incentives for teachers to carve out time in existing schedule, such as
    -promotion to master teacher/other leadership positions in school if they are good scouts
    -$ or other rewards
    -dept or other teams/competition over best scouting
    *direct creation of time through buying out 1/4-time lead scout, or paying teachers to scout during the summer or after school
    *encouragement of scouting during existing contact with students (lunch supervision, bus duty, etc.)
    *budget for scouting events (assemblies, informational lunches for students, parent night for recruiting, etc.)
    *scouting time reduced through support (e.g., others analyzing data creating scouting prospect lists, recruiting materials, etc.)

    D-Support for scouting
    *Contact info/relationship with a lead or a master scout
    -Principal check ins about progress/needs/requests for support
    *quarterly or otherwise data report/feedback on scouting progress, possible alternative approaches, etc
    *$
    *additional team check ins on what’s working what’s not/brainstorms
    *resource/idea-sharing forum




    Feedback from a principal --

    red is no
    Green is yes.

    There would be four pieces in this idea for helping teachers begin to think like scouts who are looking for missing students — (a) a change in teacher evaluation (b) training for scouting (c) creating time for scouting, and (d) support for scouting

    A – an evaluation that measured (1) growth in participation in the program, (2) growth in diversity (i.e., closure of gaps), (3) growth in success (passing increasing — in #s, not %s). If all three categories were achieved, there’d be something around a scouting merit badge (though obviously nothing so cheesy, but the point being that those three things add up to a successful AP teacher evaluation. The other part of the teacher principal conversation would be around teacher needs/supports/ideas for improving and working toward the objectives outlined in the evaluation.

    Any mention of teacher eval will result in union problems. Even if it is just a merit badge. You are looking for problems with this. I recognize teachers each month for outstanding work but the recognition is a gift card to Starbucks or some joke item. It is given for a variety of contributions so as not to make it all about one focus. Otherwise teachers do tend to resent the ones who always get recognized and never quite figure out that they are doing nothing worth recognition. it does not necessarily spur the "others" on to action or reform.

    B— scout training (preceding the evaluation), which would entail
    *potentially being option/chosen to increase buy-in (but if chosen we would try to find ways to heavily incentivize that choice)
    *hearing from master “scouts” at the school or at other schools
    *introducing and making available a scouting toolbox (or knapsack)
    *introducing incentives
    *introducing/developing individualized action plans for scouts
    *targets
    *q&a

    Keep incentives to classroom materials or pay to teacher AP lab classes. NOT merit pay. They should get it just for participating.

    C — Time for scouting, created through:
    *incentives for teachers to carve out time in existing schedule, such as
    -promotion to master teacher/other leadership positions in school if they are good scouts
    -$ or other rewards
    -dept or other teams/competition over best scouting
    *direct creation of time through buying out 1/4-time lead scout, or paying teachers to scout during the summer or after school
    *encouragement of scouting during existing contact with students (lunch supervision, bus duty, etc.)
    *budget for scouting events (assemblies, informational lunches for students, parent night for recruiting, etc.)
    *scouting time reduced through support (e.g., others analyzing data creating scouting prospect lists, recruiting materials, etc.)

    again you are treading on thin ice with the idea of incentives if they are financial and personal. Just because some one is good at getting kids to sign up for AP does not make them a master teacher. The cost to a school would be prohibitive. The key is not in finding the kids but in supporting the kids and accepting the kids once they are there.

    D-Support for scouting
    *Contact info/relationship with a lead or a master scout
    -Principal check ins about progress/needs/requests for support
    *quarterly or otherwise data report/feedback on scouting progress, possible alternative approaches, etc
    *$
    *additional team check ins on what’s working what’s not/brainstorms
    *resource/idea-sharing forum

    Time is good but it can be in the form of release time. Don't overdo the meetings as each teacher has more than just AP to deal with. We meet about 2 times per semester with AP teachers and try to pay them the $35 stipend but are not always able to do so.

    With teachers the key is finding the teacher with the right attitude towards inclusion - not the hard nosed teacher who thinks that AP is an elite class meant only for the top kids. If you get the right group of teachers then the rest is relatively easy. This is the courageous conversation that principals must have with the staff. The admin and in particular the principal sets this expectation. But if they have a staff that they know will resist then they start working behind the scenes and start recruiting. They should also make this an expectation when hiring.
    Pieces of the plan below are good but it might be a bit of overkill. the actual work is in supporting the kids, especially those who have not developed the work habits. Our teachers have all agreed that if a kid is a hard worker they can succeed. They are struggling with the unmotivated.


    FEEDBACK FROM A TEACHER
    My first thought is to include all support personnel in scouting also, i.e., guidance, nurse, media center person(s), and so on. Secondly, I would include these people in your training. When I was trying to set up the work-study programs in Ohio and SC, I felt that I made it extra hard on myself b/c I didn't include a wider net for support and education of the program. People may not want to help you, but they do want to feel included and informed. It can only help.

    Comments

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When: April 28, 2016 at the d...Falsedyoung2016-05-23T16:46:27+00:00Added tag - hotdyoungDevon Young2016-06-09 18:05:46+00:002016-06-09 18:05:46addTag16Added tag - full-cycledyoungDevon Young2016-06-09 06:22:15+00:002016-06-09 06:22:15addTag15Added tag - designed by k12 labdyoungDevon Young2016-06-09 06:22:11+00:002016-06-09 06:22:11addTag14Added tag - educator workshopdyoungDevon Young2016-06-09 06:22:06+00:002016-06-09 06:22:06addTag13Added tag - 2-daydyoungDevon Young2016-06-09 06:22:01+00:002016-06-09 06:22:01addTag12Added tag - 2016dyoungDevon Young2016-06-09 06:21:58+00:002016-06-09 06:21:58addTag11Removed tag - workshopdyoungDevon Young2016-06-09 06:21:52+00:002016-06-09 06:21:52removeTag10Removed tag - discover design thinkingdyoungDevon Young2016-06-09 06:21:50+00:002016-06-09 06:21:50removeTag9Added tag - workshopdyoungDevon Young2016-06-06 15:59:14+00:002016-06-06 15:59:14addTag8Removed tag - savedyoungDevon Young2016-06-06 15:59:10+00:002016-06-06 15:59:10removeTag7Added tag - discover design thinkingdyoungDevon Young2016-05-23 21:41:41+00:002016-05-23 21:41:41addTag6Added tag - savedyoungDevon Young2016-05-16 20:35:23+00:002016-05-16 20:35:23addTag5dyoungDevon Young2016-05-13 21:14:20+00:002016-05-13 21:14:20updated4dyoungDevon Young2016-05-11 15:57:56+00:002016-05-11 15:57:56updated3dyoungDevon Young2016-05-11 03:15:39+00:002016-05-11 03:15:39updated2First createddyoungDevon Young2016-05-11 03:01:09+00:002016-05-11 03:01:09created1wiki2016-05-13T21:14:20+00:00groups/k12/wiki/7c78cFalseDiscover Design Thinking workshop: May 5-6 2016/groups/k12/wiki/7c78c/Discover_Design_Thinking_workshop_May_56_2016.htmlDevon Young16 updatesDiscover Design Thinking workshop: May 5-6 2016 Edit this page Create a new page Delete this ...Falsedyoung2016-05-13T21:14:20+00:00Added tag - hotarazAriel Raz2016-06-09 18:05:38+00:002016-06-09 18:05:38addTag13Added tag - prototypearazAriel Raz2016-06-09 06:30:10+00:002016-06-09 06:30:10addTag12Added tag - full-cyclearazAriel Raz2016-06-09 06:30:00+00:002016-06-09 06:30:00addTag11Added tag - grades 9-12arazAriel Raz2016-06-09 06:29:55+00:002016-06-09 06:29:55addTag10Added tag - student curriculumarazAriel Raz2016-06-09 06:29:51+00:002016-06-09 06:29:51addTag9Added tag - 1-weekarazAriel Raz2016-06-09 06:28:21+00:002016-06-09 06:28:21addTag8Added tag - 2016arazAriel Raz2016-06-09 06:28:18+00:002016-06-09 06:28:18addTag7Removed tag - student workshoparazAriel Raz2016-06-09 06:28:07+00:002016-06-09 06:28:07removeTag6Removed tag - fail forwardarazAriel Raz2016-06-09 06:28:03+00:002016-06-09 06:28:03removeTag5Added tag - student workshoparazAriel Raz2016-06-06 16:37:11+00:002016-06-06 16:37:11addTag4Added tag - fail forwardarazAriel Raz2016-06-06 16:36:53+00:002016-06-06 16:36:53addTag3arazAriel Raz2016-03-14 03:01:39+00:002016-03-14 03:01:39updated2First createdarazAriel Raz2016-03-14 02:48:24+00:002016-03-14 02:48:24created1wiki2016-03-14T03:01:39+00:00groups/k12/wiki/0502dFalseMt. 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After the six of us (Rebecca, Megan, Keely, Kim, Anna, and I) from Nueva met Deepa and Veena fro...Falselbritos2009-11-19T16:29:14+00:00hot/groups/k12/search/index.rss?sort=modifiedDate&kind=all&sortDirection=reverse&excludePages=wiki/welcomelist/groups/k12/search/?sort=modifiedDate&kind=all&sortDirection=reverse&excludePages=wiki/welcomeRecent ChangesRecentChangesListUpdates?sort=modifiedDate&kind=all&sortDirection=reverse&excludePages=wiki/welcome0/groups/k12/sidebar/RecentChangesListmodifiedDateallRecent ChangesRecentChangesListUpdateswiki/welcomeNo recent changes.reverse5search