‘A problem we should all be interested in’

October 2, 2014

Wired, yes that Wired, held their first Wired by Design, bringing leading designers to Sausalito and Marin to share new and interesting ideas around a variety of topics. Stanford d.school Executive Director, Sarah Stein Greenberg was among the speakers, delivering the four prompts of Stanford 2025, the byproduct of a year-long design effort conducted by students, faculty, staff and outside collaborators here at Stanford.

A recap of her talk is now available on Wired, so definitely check it out. Here’s a snippet:

“I believe this is a problem we should all be interested in,” Greenberg said during a presentation at WIRED by Design. “We’re producing a generation of students that are very highly structured, but entering an increasingly ambiguous world—the world of Ebola and ISIS and climate change and data security breaches.”

If you want to learn more about Stanford 2025, you can find the four prompts — Axis Flip, Open Loop University, Purpose Learning and Paced Education — at 2025.stanford.edu. We’re also collecting “missions” here on the whiteboard. So, let us know what mission you would choose if, instead of majors, every college student was called on to declare a mission.

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7 Comments

  1. li

    Sarah is right, the advancement of technology is changing people’s lives at a rapid pace. And educational system should not be left behind. The future is exciting for the younger generation in academic institutions.

  2. Rhea Chatterjee

    This talk is spot on.
    My mission is making education more accessible. While I may be keen to learn and make an impact, the current education system does not pique everyone’s interest. Children from low-income households lack access to resources while the most well-off youth simply don’t take advantage of their resources. We can’t end poverty overnight or force a person to develop an interest, but we can create an environment that encourages a greater love for learning in more individuals.

  3. Nick

    Hi,
    Edu-101 level talk. I don’t know a single design school in the US which uses this lecture class model to teach design. Everything said here is done in good design schools in the US and Europe. International and local internships and study abroad opportunities are everywhere. In my experience majority of students don’t know what they want, they figure it out as they go. It’s important for students in there 20’s to have structure to their education. Buffet style education only creates confusion, lacks sequential rigor and promote populistic agendas. This is good marketing for the d school to attract confused individuals. The talk needs to be about how to balance critical thinking and visual design skills, business concepts and conceptual thinking to serve our design community.

  4. zein sakti

    This talk is spot on.
    My mission is making education more accessible. While I may be keen to learn and make an impact, the current education system does not pique everyone’s interest. Children from low-income households lack access to resources while the most well-off youth simply don’t take advantage of their resources. We can’t end poverty overnight or force a person to develop an interest, but we can create an environment that encourages a greater love for learning in more individuals.

  5. Avi

    I believe in what she says. We need to change from instruction to construction and choosing student centric methods over teacher centric methods.

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